Announcements
28.02.2022 Alexandra Yingst, University of Iceland, Reykjavík; and Stellamarina Donato, LUMSA University, Rome

In this edited volume, we will show how all genders (not only women) have importantly been involved in female migration. By studying their social networks and resources that assisted the migration process, we also aim to challenge the widespread belief that migrant women are always vulnerable. Finally, we will challenge the effect of gender constructs found in migration studies (i.e., how migrant issues are often dichotomized).

[read on...]
 
Reviews
Rev. by Philipp Glahé, Universität Heidelberg/ Centre Georg Simmel, École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales Paris

„Der Prozess ist im Wesentlichen eine amerikanische Angelegenheit. […] Die Briten haben in merklichem Umfang mitgearbeitet. Der Beitrag der Russen und Franzosen erscheint unwichtig“, schrieb der Prozessbeobachter Raymond Cartier im November 1945 in seinen offiziellen Bericht an die französische Militärverwaltungsbehörde.

[read on...]
 
 
 
Articles
By Nataša Jagdhuhn

In its very conception, the museum as an institution functions as a symbol and social lever for the consolidation of the Eurocentric idea of “universal knowledge” production, while concurrently serving the purpose of “civilizing” the “Other”. With the liberation of African countries from colonial grip following World War II, and especially in the 1960s and 1970s, debates around decolonizing museums gained importance among the newly established international circles of museum professionals.

[read on...]
 
Conference Reports
07.10.2020 - 09.10.2020 Bettina Brockmeyer (Hamburg/Erlangen); Rebekka Habermas (Göttingen); Ulrike Lindner (Cologne); Auswärtiges Amt; Gerda Henkel Foundation
By Tristan Oestermann, Institut für Geschichtswissenschaft, Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf / Ana Carolina Schveitzer, Institut für Asien- und Afrikawissenschaften, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin

The murder of George Floyd not only sparked demonstrations in the United States and Europe but also fanned the flames of an already ongoing debate about colonialism. Therefore, the conference, which was postponed and then digitized due to Covid-19, had very good timing.[1] It aimed at, as Bettina Brockmeyer put it, bringing together research, arts, and civil society in analyzing colonial memory in Germany as well as in the rest of Europe and, importantly, the Global South.

[read on...]